Family: Nobel prize winner confused when wife's body found

In this April 18, 2014, file photo, Nobel laureate and Purdue University professor Ei-ichi Negishi, left, stands with his wife Sumire after the unveiling of a bronze sculpture of him outside of Wetherill Laboratory of Chemistry on campus at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind. Sumire Negishi was found dead Tuesday, March 13, 2018, in a northern Illinois landfill after her 82-year-old husband was found wandering a road south of Rockford, Ill., police said. (Steve Scherer/Purdue University via AP)

Family members say a Nobel Prize-winning Purdue University chemistry professor was confused and searching for help when his wife's body was found at a northern Illinois landfill

ROCKFORD, Ill. — Family members say a Nobel Prize-winning Purdue University chemistry professor was confused and searching for help when his wife's body was found at a northern Illinois landfill.

The relatives told WTHR-TV in Indianapolis that 80-year-old Sumire Negishi (soo-MEE'-la nah-GEE'-shee) was "near the end of her battle with Parkinson's" disease and was traveling with her husband, 82-year-old professor Ei-ichi Negishi (aich nah-GEE'-shee).

The Ogle County Sheriff's Office said deputies found Sumire Negishi's body and the couple's vehicle Tuesday at Orchard Hills Landfill outside Rockford. Shortly after, they found Ei-ichi Negishi walking nearby.

Family members say he was apparently in "an acute state of confusion and shock." They say the vehicle was stuck in a ditch.

Ogle County authorities have said they don't suspect foul play in the woman's death.

Negishi won the 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Related News

Body donations on the rise at US medical schools

Aug 17, 2016

Many U.S. medical schools are seeing a surge in the number people leaving their bodies to science

'Auction' of NSA tools sends security companies scrambling

Aug 18, 2016

The leak of what purports to be a National Security Agency tool kit as part of a surreal online auction has set the information security world atwitter

'Mr. Robot' mobile game launches as phony messaging app

Aug 17, 2016

A fake messaging app inspired by the USA Network hacker 'Mr. Robot' was released Tuesday for mobile devices

About The Next Discovery

The Next Discovery is equipped with recent Science & Tech news to impart knowledge to individuals awaiting the future.

Contact us: sales@tndiscovery.com